BOOK DETAILS

Miami Contingent

Miami Contingent

by Robert Earl

ISBN: 9781480809536

Publisher ArchwayPublishing

Published in Literature & Fiction

Are you an AUTHOR? Click here to include your books on BookDaily.com

Book Description

"Miami Contingent" is a compelling urban tale that provides a glimpse into a gritty trek through the streets of Miami's forbidden neighborhoods as a girl grows into a woman and does everything she can just to survive.

Sample Chapter

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

Chapter 1

 

 

 

 

 

“Don’t be beatin’ on my doe like you the Po Po, bitch. You done lost your mind or somethin’?” Poppa Queen screamed out as he peered through the peephole of the low-income apartment’s reinforced steel door. His dilated pupils focused on the blurred figure of a vivacious young girl standing in the darkened hallway. She wore braids and beads in her hair and was listening to her Walkman, jamming to the music. This pretty little girl he recognized was little Renee Jenkins, the only daughter of the very sexy Moncell Jenkins. He used to fantasize about scoring a piece of Moncell’s red ass, the way she walked around the neighborhood and carried herself like she was a queen or something. The mere thought alone was a turn-on, but he’d gotten the distinct impression that Moncell thought she was too good for the likes of him, with her dope-fiend ass. Reluctantly, he had left that fantasy alone, replacing it with hostility and contempt for her.

 

Poppa hardly cared for anybody, much less the Jenkins clan. He was considered an old-school thug, a hardened criminal despite his young age of thirty-two. He had already served repeated time on Florida’s infamous chain gangs. Being in and out of trouble with the authorities most of his life only contributed to the animosity and disdain he felt for society. His formal education was cut short after attacking a teacher and being expelled from grade school. Consequently, he was more than adequately compensated with his PhD from SWU (Sidewalk University). Being streetwise leveled the playing field, so to speak, and he was shrewd and cunning, more so than he appeared. Past abuses had helped to make Poppa quick-tempered and extremely violent.

 

Moncell’s younger brother, Money Jenkins, had humiliated him in a prison yard fight while they were serving time in Raeford Prison up in Stark Florida. Let Poppa tell it; he won the fight that day.

 

Poppa felt the scar beneath his chin that he’d received from that fight while he undid four locks and swung the door open, proceeding to go off on a verbal rant like some crazy man, spit flying everywhere as he hollered and screamed.

 

“You ain’t got no fucking sense? Blowing people’s high, beating on the doe like that? People gettin high in here, they want it quiet! Should kick your little ass. Fuck you want anyway? What’s that smell?” He wiped away the excess white powder from under his wide nose with his jeweled pinky finger. Looking down, he realized that she wasn’t alone. She had her little brother, Sean, with her.

 

The child was two years old, snotty nosed, dirty, and needed to be changed. He had do-doed on himself in the hallway, and Poppa hadn’t helped by screaming at them. Sean really didn’t smell all that bad; Poppa’s sense of smell was simply heightened from snortingcocaine.Y’all crumb snatchersain’t in school today? What time it is?” he said, yawning as he cooled down from his hissy fit.   

 

Renee slowly looked up, taking in the five-foot-nine gargoyle figure of what to her was the ugliest human being she had ever seen in her entire eleven years of life. Poppa was ashy black, wide nosed, and resembled the cartoon character Bullwinkle the moose. He sported a mouth full of gold teeth that made his breath smell bad, and his hair was matted into long, unkempt, horrible-looking, De La Soul ghetto braids. Poppa wore his pants sagging under his buttocks, about to fall off at any minute, a white wife-beater undershirt, and he was draped in gold chains.

 

He held a nine-millimeter Glock pistol down to his side while looking around cautiously, as was his habit every time he answered the door. Multiple tattoos adorned his hardened prison body, but you couldn’t make them out; he was so black he could leave fingerprints on a piece of coal. Therefore the tattoos just looked like a bunch of lines drawn against his charcoal hue. He had intentionally done his best to intimidate and instill fear into this child of the ghetto, who simply smacked her lips and wondered to herself if he actually thought he was all of that and a bag of chips.

 

Renee, twisting her neck, stepped back, placing her hands on her narrow hips. Rolling her little eyes at him, she replied, “Why you talk to people like that? I am not a dog. Hum, you probably smell your house.” Poppa’s jaw dropped. He wasn’t expecting that kind of response. She sensed it from his body language and continued, “Everybody know school is closed on Saturdays.” Shaking her head, she looked at her little watch and said, “It’s eleven thirty, thank you very much.” Smiling, she added, “Momma said you’re to never even kick a dog.” “Hum” smacking her lips ghetto style.

 

He didn’t know if he should shoot her ass or bow down. He thought to himself,  little bitch, but he dared not speak it out loud. Finally, he licked his lips and sighed, trying to appear in control of that which was lost.“You’s a smart-ass little girl, just like yo mama. What you want? Ain’t got all day to be messing with you.”

 

“Momma said she wants three and one, three boys and one girl. Momma said you know the deal,” Renee replied.

 

Poppa knew all too well the deal. He knew that she wanted heroin, also known as boy, and cocaine, also known as girl, the terms affectionately used in the streets. Poppa said, “Okay. But no credit. Twenty dollars cash or get lost.”

 

Renee took off her tennis shoe, found what she was looking for, and then handed him a crumpled twenty-dollar bill, saying as sweetly as she could, “Here you go, Mister Poppa.” He snatched the money from out of her hand and disappeared behind the door.

 

 

Excerpted from "Miami Contingent" by Robert Earl. Copyright © 0 by Robert Earl. Excerpted by permission. All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher. Excerpts are provided solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.
Thanks for reading!

Join BookDaily now and receive featured titles to sample for free by email.
Reading a book excerpt is the best way to evaluate it before you spend your time or money.

Just enter your email address and password below to get started:

  
  

Your email address is safe with us. Privacy policy
By clicking ”Get Started“ you agree to the Terms of Use. All fields are required

Instant Bonus: Get immediate access to a daily updated listing of free ebooks from Amazon when you confirm your account!

Author Profile

Robert Earl

Robert Earl

Robert Earl was born in Baltimore, Maryland. He resides in the Miami area. He is a successful realtor and world traveler, and is currently attending the University of Miami. His writing is inspired by his countless experiences from living in the dark abyss of drug addiction for over twenty years. This is his debut novel.

View full Profile of Robert Earl

Amazon Reviews

TOP FIVE TITLES